Mental Illness: Why Aren’t We Talking About It?

One in five adults have a mental health condition. Let that sink in. That’s over 40 million Americans, and the number is steadily rising. While the mainstream media loves to undermine America’s mental health crisis to further their anti-gun agenda, the facts are hard to dismiss.

3.JPGThe United States has a serious problem, with a serious workforce shortage that further exacerbates the issue.

In the paragraphs following I will shed light on my key findings through research of Psychology Today, The National Institute of Mental Health, Mental Health America and more. Having experienced and battled with mental illness myself, this study hits close to home. My hopes in publishing my work is to shed light on the ever-growing problem, discuss potential solutions, and walk away feeling enlightened and determined to be the means to an end needed to better combat the rise seen in mental illnesses in America.

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Of the 43 million, nearly 56% do not receive treatment. Not including the 76% of youth who are left with little to no sufficient treatment and care options.

That’s more than the populations of New York and Florida combined. 

Before we dig too far into this pandemic, let us first define what I mean when I say “mental illness.”

Mental Illness, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association, is a health condition involving changes in thinking, emotion or behavior (or a combination of these). Mental illnesses are associate with distress and/or problems functioning in social, work or family activities. Further, the illness does not discriminate; it can affect anyone regardless of age, gender, social status, race, etc. While is can affect anyone at any time, most cases are identified by age 24.

Common symptoms include but are not limited to prolonged depression, feelings of extreme highs and lows, excessive fears, worries and anxieties, social withdrawal, strong feelings of anger, a growing inability to cope with daily problems and activities, suicidal thoughts, and more. With over 200 classifications, such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, etc. its toll affects each and every one of us in some capacity whether it be direct or inadvertent.

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Despite its scope and severity rising in the millions, we have still yet to see commensurate visibility, policy reform, research, or funding on a local and federal level.

So what should we do? Can we even help? Well, the first thing to know is that there is hope for those battling mental illness. Between seeking psychological treatment methods and utilizing medications, even the most complex cases can see major changes in just a few short months.

On the flip side of this I want to write a disclaimer. Just speaking from personal experience. Seeking out a psychologist can prove to be immensely beneficial for not only you, but for your loved ones and families who provide your support network as well. However, it is common to get comfortable living in the anxiety and emotions of what you’re battling. Often times seeking a psychologist can provide short-lived relief, but can also make the healing process even more drawn out.

From my own experiences I know that there came a time where I was so comfortable in feeling miserable for myself that I let it take over me. It seeped into every aspect of my life. Every time I would speak with my counselor I would live in the past. I’d fixate on things and develop compulsive thoughts. There came a point where I had to just part ways with the process, accept how far I had come, and move on! Luckily my family was able to snap me out of the funk I was in. They said,

“Amanda, sometimes you act like you’re the only one going through anything. Everyone battles their own demons. But the longer you let it control your happiness, the less time you have to live your life.”

Which brings me to my next point… surround yourself by family and friends.

One of the biggest lies you can tell yourself is that you are alone in this. Let me just tell you, you are not! The more you surround yourself by those who will remind you of this, the better you’ll feel. Now all that to say, we must find a more comprehensive solution at every level.

On a Federal level, the government plays a major role in regulating systems and providers relating to mental health in America. They also set the tone in terms of the quality of care given.  In other words, the federal government ultimately provides the oversight across the states. They also controls the protection of rights given to individuals with mental health disorders, as well as the sustained funding and ongoing research. Here is where I feel we can expand the most in terms of monetary changes as well as raising awareness.

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While the government does provide a major funding stream, including a match of Medicaid (single largest funder of mental health services in the country), we are still facing a startling shortage in qualified workforce professionals. Alongside a shortage of providers, we’ve seen a lack of accountability in diagnosing and treating children from an early age, often times missing the crucial onset of symptoms. Lastly, while we are constantly gaining insights into the mind and it’s complexities, there is still a lot to learn. Funding research must be put on the forefront of any political campaign, rather that be at the local or national level. Which means we, as a society, must hold our world leaders accountable!

If you feel called to raise awareness and make a difference, click here to maintain your voice in the federal decision-making processes on mental health! Or, let your money do the talking and donate to Mental Health America for research and treatment solutions.

If you or a loved one you know are struggling, please call or click the

“Get Immediate Help” link to find out more.

There is so much more to this life than what you’re feeling right now. I promise you things will get better and know I’m always here if you need someone to talk to.

Get Immediate help

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Vetrans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255 Press 1.

Author: aenderby

Welcome to my little corner of the web!

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